Yoga for children: a playful approach

omgiyoga_com
omgiyoga_com
9 Min Read


Yoga class

Yoga is not just for adults. In Pastetten, children are also having fun with it.

“I can do it!”

Cheerful children’s voices ring out in the yoga class of Amanda Ditterich in the Pastetten holiday program. Those who have only known yoga from adults and have in their mind’s eye the image of an introverted person sitting cross-legged should quickly part with this cliche. Because the little ones are quite lively at it.

Four boys and a girl between the ages of three and six had gathered on their mats around the children’s yoga teacher on the floor of the parish hall. In the foreground was initially the group motto mentioned at the beginning “I can do it!”, and then a few important instructions such as “I stay on my mat!” were repeated. And of course it should lie flat on the ground.

After everyone had introduced themselves in a playful way, the sun salutation was on the program – a yoga exercise that consists of a certain sequence of movements. Then there were games with lots of movements – just the right thing for the children on vacation.

“I think of a story and design the yoga class from it,” explains Ditterich. The topics for this are very diverse: in addition to the fire brigade, there is also the zoo or a farm. Even the weather can be actively implemented with movements. So the little ones were allowed to fly like a bird, row like in a boat, or crawl like a spider. The children naturally pay attention to every detail. “But a spider has eight legs,” could be heard as well as “I can roar much louder as a lion”. Time and again, the course instructor conjured up surprises, such as a real bell for the alarm in the fire brigade game. Colorful scarves were also incorporated into the lesson, as well as music for the movement.

Eventually it became quieter – the participants played pizza bakers, rolled out the imaginary dough and topped it. While it was baking in the imaginary oven, it was time for a story to relax with calm breaths and subsequent stretching.

Ditterich finds it important and meaningful that even the youngest children deal with yoga. The young woman is not only a specialist PTA (pharmaceutical-technical assistant) for nutritional counseling and general pharmacy, but also a trained children’s yoga teacher. “Yoga picks up the little ones in their urge to move. Motor skills are trained, and learning elements are always integrated, ”she explains. Nowadays children are surrounded by electronics from an early age. “Nobody knows how to play properly or how to deal with their bodies anymore.” In her yoga classes, which are either based on a children’s book or a specific topic, the little ones can really let off steam – like a striking horse or as a jumping frog. Towards the end, however, it becomes more and more relaxed, and at the end there is often a mutual massage and at the very end about two minutes of relaxation. “I think it’s important that children are supported and strengthened,” says Ditterich, “with a little help it always works.”

Yoga for children: a playful approach

Yoga is not just for adults. In Pastetten, children are also having fun with it.

“I can do it!”

Cheerful children’s voices ring out in the yoga class of Amanda Ditterich in the Pastetten holiday program. Those who have only known yoga from adults and have in their mind’s eye the image of an introverted person sitting cross-legged should quickly part with this cliche. Because the little ones are quite lively at it.

Four boys and a girl between the ages of three and six had gathered on their mats around the children’s yoga teacher on the floor of the parish hall. In the foreground was initially the group motto mentioned at the beginning “I can do it!”, and then a few important instructions such as “I stay on my mat!” were repeated. And of course it should lie flat on the ground.

After everyone had introduced themselves in a playful way, the sun salutation was on the program – a yoga exercise that consists of a certain sequence of movements. Then there were games with lots of movements – just the right thing for the children on vacation.

“I think of a story and design the yoga class from it,” explains Ditterich. The topics for this are very diverse: in addition to the fire brigade, there is also the zoo or a farm. Even the weather can be actively implemented with movements. So the little ones were allowed to fly like a bird, row like in a boat, or crawl like a spider. The children naturally pay attention to every detail. “But a spider has eight legs,” could be heard as well as “I can roar much louder as a lion”. Time and again, the course instructor conjured up surprises, such as a real bell for the alarm in the fire brigade game. Colorful scarves were also incorporated into the lesson, as well as music for the movement.

Eventually it became quieter – the participants played pizza bakers, rolled out the imaginary dough and topped it. While it was baking in the imaginary oven, it was time for a story to relax with calm breaths and subsequent stretching.

Ditterich finds it important and meaningful that even the youngest children deal with yoga. The young woman is not only a specialist PTA (pharmaceutical-technical assistant) for nutritional counseling and general pharmacy, but also a trained children’s yoga teacher. “Yoga picks up the little ones in their urge to move. Motor skills are trained, and learning elements are always integrated, ”she explains. Nowadays children are surrounded by electronics from an early age. “Nobody knows how to play properly or how to deal with their bodies anymore.” In her yoga classes, which are either based on a children’s book or a specific topic, the little ones can really let off steam – like a striking horse or as a jumping frog. Towards the end, however, it becomes more and more relaxed, and at the end there is often a mutual massage and at the very end about two minutes of relaxation. “I think it’s important that children are supported and strengthened,” says Ditterich, “with a little help it always works.”

Yoga children

Also interesting

Yoga, children, movement, relaxation, learning

Author: Amanda Ditterich

Amanda Ditterich is a trained children’s yoga teacher and specialist PTA for nutritional counseling and general pharmacy.

Share This Article